The issues of afghan women regarding getting education

Since taking power in Afghanistan inthe Taliban had almost entirely shut girls out of education. But because many madrasas are unregistered and operate outside the government education system, they may not use the government curriculum, and children cannot necessarily easily transfer from a madrasa to a government school.

I hope the day of our dreams and wishes can come true.

Women's rights in Afghanistan

There is still a large number of mullahs who oppose the education of girls and create hurdles. But because these specialized classes are funded solely by donors and implemented by nongovernmental organizations, they have no consistent connection with the government school system and come and go due to the unreliable cycles of funding to nongovernmental organizations.

Many men were killed in the armed conflicts, and older husbands are likely to die sooner than their child brides. After the fall of the Taliban, Afghan women wanted to continue their studies. The Afghan government also has a legal obligation to take all appropriate legislative, administrative, social, and educational measures to protect children from all forms of physical and mental violence, injury or abuse, neglect or negligent treatment, and ma"ltr"eatment.

There were around female professors and 22, female teachers. But beyond the real problems that prevent girls from going school is the cultural. Like acid attacks, kidnappings have a broad impact, with a single kidnapping prompting many families in a community to keep children—especially girls—home.

I think boys [now] have more rights to get education. According to international standards established by UNESCO, the government should spend at least 15 to 20 percent of total national budget, and 4 to 6 percent of GDP, on education.

The Taliban declared that women were forbidden to go to work and they were not to leave their homes unless accompanied by a male family member. Families that were unsure about whether girls should study or not are easily swayed by rising insecurity into deciding it is better for girls to stay home and, often, to work instead of study.

As the troops drew down, the aid funding typically did as well. And simply by empowering women farmers with the same access to land, new technologies and capital as men, we can increase crop yields by as much as 30 percent helping to feed a growing population. In these cases, children need to buy the books from a bookstore to keep up with their studies.

Afghan government data indicates that girls who did not study are three times as likely to marry before age 18 as girls who completed secondary education or higher.

Afghanistan: Girls Struggle for an Education

But he died, so I could go. These indirect costs are enough to keep many children from poor families out of school, especially girls, as families that can afford to send only some of their children often give preference to boys.Education Problems in Afghanistan In the 21st century getting a higher education is a dream for women in Afghanistan, a dream that may not come true.

Continuous war in some places and cultural issues are enormous challenges for Afghan women.

Gender Equality and Women's Empowerment

Being an educated woman is a big achievement. Beyond investing in protective security measures, the only way to ensure women’s human rights in Afghanistan and to truly empower women in the long run is through offering primary, secondary, and higher education that will foster literacy, free-thinking, and knowledge of.

“The Afghan government and donors made bold promises in to get all girls into education, but insecurity, poverty, and displacement are now driving many girls out of school,” said Liesl.

Education Problems in Afghanistan In the 21st century getting a higher education is a dream for women in Afghanistan, a dream that may not come true.

In Afghanistan, women and girls strive to get an education

Continuous war in some places and cultural issues are enormous challenges for Afghan women. Being an educated woman is a big achievement.

Education is the foundation for civic participation, and schools are formative in shaping how children and young people view themselves and others. Accordingly, it is essential that school environments foster gender equality and provide safe spaces in which all students can learn.

The recently adopted Afghan constitution states that “the citizens of Afghanistan –whether man or woman—have equal rights and duties before the law.” Women even have been appointed to prominent positions in the government.

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The issues of afghan women regarding getting education
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